Posts Tagged ‘displaced persons’

In a prior post I explained how I received scanned copies of documents pertaining to my father from Arolsen Archives. I’m still reviewing those documents and trying to develop some type of timeline for my fathers time in Germany.

From my review of the documents that I have I determined that my father was taken from the family farm in 1942 and shipped off to Germany. This is detailed in the card shown below as Card 1 & Card 2. Card one is in German and seems to have been created on the 25th of April in 1966. The English version is Card 2 that looks to have been created on the 16th of February in 1989.

The cards state my father’s name, his father’s name (presumably given by my father to whichever official was taking down the information), my father’s birth year (other documents show a different year), and place of birth. Additionally, the notation states that my father was shipped off (deported) to Germany in 1942. So, the cards establish my father’s presence in Germany from some time in 1942. There are no documents that definitely place him in any specific location or occupancy between 1942 and 1945.

The next card establishes his location in 1945.

Registration Card – 24 May 1954

Another piece of information that I come across is a registration card for my father while he was in Sulmingen, Germany. The card states that he was there as of the 24th of May in 1945. The information on the card states my father’s:

  1. Name (Surname): Iwaniw
  2. Vorname (First Name): Theodor
  3. Tag und Ort Der Geburt (Date & Pace of Birth): 18 March 1919, Lutowiska
  4. Staatsangehorigkeit (Nationality): Polen-Ukrainer (Poland-Ukrainian)
  5. Unterkunftsort (In): Sulmingen
  6. Arbeitsstelle (Place of Work): Theresia Ackermann, Landwirtschaft (Agriculture-farmhand)
  7. Von (From): 1945 Bis (To): 25.5.1945 (25th May 1945)
  8. The following fields were left blank –
    Wurde der Arbeiter restlos entlohnt (Was the worker completely paid)
    Dienstverpflichtet (Service required)
    Freier Arbeiter (Free Worker)
    Seit (Since)
    Anschrift (Address)
  9. Ort (Place): Sulmingen, 6 NOV 1949
  10. Kreis (District): Biberach

Then there is a signature and an embossed stamp.

Yet another scanned document that I received was another registration record in Ulm.

Registration Record – Ulm

Now this document has some interesting discrepancies with the prior registration card. The nationality on this record states Russland (Russian) while the previous one stated Poland-Ukrainian. The other discrepancy is my father’s birthdate – the previous record showed his birthdate as 18 March 1919. This record shows his birthdate as 18 March 1918. Could it have been transcribed incorrectly by the clerk who created the record?

The other item of interest I found with this record is his occupation. It states he was a Cobbler/Shoemaker in Ulm. In Sulmingen he was a farm laborer. His occupation and address in Ulm (Karlstrabe 39) match another document from the Arolsen Archives and an additional documents I received from the archivist in Neu Ulm, Germany.

The registration date is listed as 15 August 1945 and ending/cancellation date is 12 September 1945.

The registration card for Sulmingen states that it pertains to persecutees in the later French Zone. I need to research further information on my father while he was in Sulmingen.

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Previously I posted my discovery of my family’s information on the passenger list of the Blatchford that brought them to America from Germany.  As I stated before, hearsay is good but documentation is gold.  I also had come across church records from my father’s village in present day Poland before and still need to visually scan those microfilmed records.

Well, now I’ve found out about a web site that has digitized the records and lists from Displaced Person Camps in Germany from after World War II.  The web site is called International Tracing Service and pertains to the people who were in Nazi concentration camps, labor camps, and ghettos.  My parents met while they were interned in a labor camp in Ulm, Germany.  I’m hoping to find some information about my family on this site.  Otherwise, I’d have to write to someone in Germany to see if I could locate any records.  To that point, I heard from someone on another genealogy group that suggested that I check out another person’s web site, Olga Kaczmar’s genealogy site.  I was informed that Olga’s site had a lot of information on gathering information from Germany.  I’ve added that to my To-Do list.

The Service is still adding to their digitized collection so if I don’t find anything now I’ll have to come back.  I use Evernote to keep track of these web sites and articles that I find useful and may want to refer back to in the future.  And when I get a chance, I’ll update the links found on the right sidebar.

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General_R._M._Blatchford

As I posted before in a previous article, I had found information on the ship that my family “supposedly” came into the US on.  I say supposedly because that was what I was told.  Hearsay is good but documentation is gold.  In searching FamilySearch.org I decided to research my father’s name.  I heard that FamilySearch was making available the Port of New York’s passenger lists of those entering the country through 1957.

I located the passenger list that included my father, mother, and sister.  Now, I had documented information about them and their entry into the US.  The passenger list confirms that they did arrive on the Blatchford, they did depart from Bremerhaven, Germany.  Some additional information from the list was that they embarked on the 8th of June 1950 and they arrived at the Port of New on the 24th of June 1950.  

In order to enter the United States my family had to provide an address where they were going to live in the US.  That information is also included on the passenger list for my family.

Little by little I am confirming and building documentation pertaining to my family history.

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