Posts Tagged ‘ukrainian’

In a prior post I explained how I received scanned copies of documents pertaining to my father from Arolsen Archives. I’m still reviewing those documents and trying to develop some type of timeline for my fathers time in Germany.

From my review of the documents that I have I determined that my father was taken from the family farm in 1942 and shipped off to Germany. This is detailed in the card shown below as Card 1 & Card 2. Card one is in German and seems to have been created on the 25th of April in 1966. The English version is Card 2 that looks to have been created on the 16th of February in 1989.

The cards state my father’s name, his father’s name (presumably given by my father to whichever official was taking down the information), my father’s birth year (other documents show a different year), and place of birth. Additionally, the notation states that my father was shipped off (deported) to Germany in 1942. So, the cards establish my father’s presence in Germany from some time in 1942. There are no documents that definitely place him in any specific location or occupancy between 1942 and 1945.

The next card establishes his location in 1945.

Registration Card – 24 May 1954

Another piece of information that I come across is a registration card for my father while he was in Sulmingen, Germany. The card states that he was there as of the 24th of May in 1945. The information on the card states my father’s:

  1. Name (Surname): Iwaniw
  2. Vorname (First Name): Theodor
  3. Tag und Ort Der Geburt (Date & Pace of Birth): 18 March 1919, Lutowiska
  4. Staatsangehorigkeit (Nationality): Polen-Ukrainer (Poland-Ukrainian)
  5. Unterkunftsort (In): Sulmingen
  6. Arbeitsstelle (Place of Work): Theresia Ackermann, Landwirtschaft (Agriculture-farmhand)
  7. Von (From): 1945 Bis (To): 25.5.1945 (25th May 1945)
  8. The following fields were left blank –
    Wurde der Arbeiter restlos entlohnt (Was the worker completely paid)
    Dienstverpflichtet (Service required)
    Freier Arbeiter (Free Worker)
    Seit (Since)
    Anschrift (Address)
  9. Ort (Place): Sulmingen, 6 NOV 1949
  10. Kreis (District): Biberach

Then there is a signature and an embossed stamp.

Yet another scanned document that I received was another registration record in Ulm.

Registration Record – Ulm

Now this document has some interesting discrepancies with the prior registration card. The nationality on this record states Russland (Russian) while the previous one stated Poland-Ukrainian. The other discrepancy is my father’s birthdate – the previous record showed his birthdate as 18 March 1919. This record shows his birthdate as 18 March 1918. Could it have been transcribed incorrectly by the clerk who created the record?

The other item of interest I found with this record is his occupation. It states he was a Cobbler/Shoemaker in Ulm. In Sulmingen he was a farm laborer. His occupation and address in Ulm (Karlstrabe 39) match another document from the Arolsen Archives and an additional documents I received from the archivist in Neu Ulm, Germany.

The registration date is listed as 15 August 1945 and ending/cancellation date is 12 September 1945.

The registration card for Sulmingen states that it pertains to persecutees in the later French Zone. I need to research further information on my father while he was in Sulmingen.

I was browsing Ebay today and decided to do a search on my family name. What a surprise when the search results return an item being sold with my mother’s name in the title.

What was being sold was an old press photo from my hometown’s newspaper. This was from when the newspaper did an article on the parish’s Ukrainian Festival in 1987. It was a picture of my mother sitting at a table loaded with Ukrainian ceramic pieces. My father use to create ceramic pieces with Ukrainian designs and they use to sell them at the Ukrainian festivals. So, the picture of my mother manning the ceramic table at the 1987 Parish Ukrainian Festival (see below).

The quality of the photo isn’t that good because it needed to be a high-contrasting photo to translate over to newsprint well.

“Natalia Iwaniw of Syracuse looks after a booth of Ukrainian ceramics made by her husband” from the 1987 Ukrainian Parish Festival. Photo by Julie Malakie, Aug 1, 1987

This would be something that I include in my story about my family. Just another facet of my family history.

Previously I posted my discovery of my family’s information on the passenger list of the Blatchford that brought them to America from Germany.  As I stated before, hearsay is good but documentation is gold.  I also had come across church records from my father’s village in present day Poland before and still need to visually scan those microfilmed records.

Well, now I’ve found out about a web site that has digitized the records and lists from Displaced Person Camps in Germany from after World War II.  The web site is called International Tracing Service and pertains to the people who were in Nazi concentration camps, labor camps, and ghettos.  My parents met while they were interned in a labor camp in Ulm, Germany.  I’m hoping to find some information about my family on this site.  Otherwise, I’d have to write to someone in Germany to see if I could locate any records.  To that point, I heard from someone on another genealogy group that suggested that I check out another person’s web site, Olga Kaczmar’s genealogy site.  I was informed that Olga’s site had a lot of information on gathering information from Germany.  I’ve added that to my To-Do list.

The Service is still adding to their digitized collection so if I don’t find anything now I’ll have to come back.  I use Evernote to keep track of these web sites and articles that I find useful and may want to refer back to in the future.  And when I get a chance, I’ll update the links found on the right sidebar.

As I posted before, I have limited amounts of records to research in the United States.  I am the first generation of my family to be born in the US so my research takes me immediately to Eastern Europe for both my parents.  

With the help of other Ukrainian family researchers from a maillist I belong to, I was able to locate some records to help me with my family research.  It was suggested that instead of focusing on the specific surname at FamilySearch.org, that I instead search out my father’s home village.  When I did that I came up with a lot of records regarding Lutowiska.  These records were microfilmed by the LDS but haven’t been transcribed or indexed.  This makes it a major challenge.

What I will end up having to do is to visually scan each frame of the microfilm looking for the relevant information.  To add to the difficulty is the fact that there is no table of content and everything is written in cursive.  Just one set of birth, marriage, baptismal, and death records is 879 individual frames.  When I did a quick perusal of random pages, they didn’t seem to be in any alphabetic order but were in date sequence.  That doesn’t help if you don’t know the specific date of an event.  Another issue is the date ranges of the records that are available (i.e. 1864-1879) which then precludes me from searching for events that happened outside of that range.  And lastly, there is a disclaimer with the records that some records were not able to be scanned because the pages were too damaged to scan or too faded/illegible to scan.

But this will be a long and tedious undertaking and hopefully will pay off by finding the records I need.  I have found an online tool, Evernote, that is of great help in saving whatever information and resources I do locate so that I can go back to them at a later date.

Lutowiska
Lutowiska

clipartuse.com

Welcome to the new Iwaniw.net web site. I decided to turn this into a blog site so that I could post information about what was going on in the family and to detail my genealogy activities. I’ve decided to concentrate on keeping the main online family tree web site updated in one location. Instead of trying to maintain a different number of sites, I decided to keep only one updated. I will be working on all of the other ones to have them point to the one site.  It gets confusing, but I’ll work it out.